Latest Project : Heathrow Terminal 5 Installation

  • By Pangostudios
  • 14 Jul, 2016

It’s been an exciting month for us at PangoStudios. We have had the pleasure of working with artist Henry Reichold on a ground breaking project that brings 2D imagery into another dimension using 3D printing, which will be on display at Heathrow Airport in July.  

How were we involved?

Henry approached us with his 3D photography idea explaining it was to be 5 individual pieces of art made up of a total of 12 different pieces. They would need to be joined, cast, polished and assembled like one big jigsaw, and we love a good jigsaw!

Having worked with 3D printing for a few years we were very excited to be a part of this revolutionary display, what he had captured with his camera and transformed into a 3D print was incredible! Over the period of a month, we proceed to carry out the work and eventually, after much polishing (and quite a lot of mess), the bronze piece was complete!

Once the prints were ready we got stuck into removing the support material and cleaning up the prints, after came assembling them and creating the mould. Once this was set we went about adding on the extra details and polishing it up to give it that proper bronze shine!  

There are so many intricate details on this piece; you have to spend time observing. Through the process of making we spent so much time with each piece that new details would appear at every stage. Things like the tiny lettering in Covent Garden, the number plates on the route master busses, the faces of the tiny figures, the clothes hanging up in Camden Town, the list could go on. The detail in this 3D photograph is second to none.

The installation will be on display at Heathrow Airport Terminal 5 from the 19th of July for 3 months. If you find yourself in the area anytime soon make sure you swing by and see it for yourself! You can also read more on the project here.  

Share your pictures of the artwork by uploading them to Twitter, Instagram or Facebook tagging @Pangostudios.

By Pangostudios 28 Sep, 2017

Earlier this summer the team at Pango Studios took a trip to The Albany in Deptford for an evening of revelling in our inner (or outer) nerds and enjoying the well versed chorus of comedy from the brilliant trio of science stand-up Matt Parker, Steve Mould and Helen Arny aka Festival Of The Spoken Nerd.


No matter how extensive or otherwise your science knowledge, how high or low you rate on the nerd graph or where you sit on the Venn Diagram, these guys manage to make science funny for everyone. What’s so brilliant about Just for Graphs is that it absolutely makes learning about science fun so that you don’t even realise you’re learning. We won’t give away any spoilers (you’ll have to  buy their DVD  for that!) but we highly recommend you go and see them for yourselves - they are soon to start their new UK tour You Can’t Polish A Nerd. Find more details  here .

By Pangostudios 09 May, 2017

Last week was London Craft Week so I decided to go and have a wander to see what the talented folk of today are up to. It was fascinating to see all the different things that fellow craftsmen are making and getting the opportunity to learn more about their work. These few hours increased both my appreciation for other crafts and my respect for the artisans.


I saw beautiful wooden tables being carved at Method Studio; learnt about the complex process Struthers London undertake to create their bespoke watches; witnessed the time it takes an artisan from Louboutin make a single leather tassel; and heard the story that led Loraine Rutt to form The Little Globe Co.


My first stop was a treat! I met Craig and Rebecca Struthers of Struthers London and saw how they design and make their stunning watches with particular attention to the practical needs of the user. Their effort and dedication is reflected in the quality and incredible precision of each piece. To me, each one felt like a modern-day treasure with a timeless (no pun intended) quality that will, no doubt, see it passed down for many generations.


Later in the afternoon, I stopped by the Shapero Modern art gallery to see a demonstration by ceramicist and former cartographer Loraine Rutt. Her background and interest in maps along with the advances in technology led her to create small ceramic pocket globes. I was fascinated to learn that she uses custom-made 3D prints of the Earth (or moon-depending on the piece!) created by 3D mapping as her starting point. Loraine explained how she would not have been able to create her globes as accurately as she does without the new technologies that capture the real life contours of the planet.


People often fear that 3D printing will overthrow traditional crafts and these skills will be lost. However, it seems to me that 3D printing can co-exist happily alongside traditional crafts and moreover, it can be used as a tool to enable traditional craftsmen and women to push their creative boundaries and develop ideas that wouldn’t have been possible a few years ago.


Check out further highlights from London Craft Week 2017  here .


By Pangostudios 29 Mar, 2017

We had the pleasure of of being invited to attend the Animal Anatomy Art Exhibition hosted by the Royal Veterinary College in Camden on Monday. The space was filled with brightly coloured, incredibly animated and intricate drawings by all those who had attended the spring drawing classes.

What an incredible place to be inspired and to see how beautifully science and art can intertwine. The RVC Museum is full of skeletons and dissected animals. These preserved natural nuggets, whilst sounding grim, are in fact crucial in helping scientists understand the many complexities of both animals and humans.

Observing the drawings at the exhibition and speaking to the brilliant Tim Pond, reinforced the fact that art plays an extremely important role in communicating how animals work. His vivid drawings, and indeed those of the students, really get you thinking about the unseen parts of the animal and how their incredible features have evolved. Did you know that there are over 8 different types of giraffe patterns?! And these patterns and their pigments vary depending on their location! You can read more about it here .

It was a great evening seeing art and science come together to demonstrate the wonderful workings of nature.

Check out more of the incredible drawings on the RVC Facebook page !



By Pangostudios 08 Nov, 2016

Remember that feeling the morning of a school trip? The excitement at breakfast, getting to school early, finding your friends, walking in pairs along the pavement, piling into the coach, trying not to feel sick on the journey? This is how we felt on our way to the ‘Science and Art Twilight Networking Event’ hosted by the Royal Society of Chemistry. It may have been raining and cold but our spirits would not be dampened!

The first thing we saw was a bright white light radiating from an SEAHA van outside. Naturally, we went to investigate. Inside the van was a fully equipped laboratory that enables a team to capture detailed image data of heritage sites, old artwork and archaeological digs on the go. This lab-on-wheels is a brilliant idea and means that the artefacts can remain in situ, preserving the sites for future generations.

That wasn’t the end of the excitement! Next, we went into the main building and were immediately greeted with bangs and booms of an experiment. There we met Andreas Tretiakov who created a fiery explosion of fairy liquid in the palm of my hand (I assure you, I was the appropriate level of scared, no more) and all sorts of other multi-coloured crackling indoor fireworks. A feast for the eyes! There were artists and scientists from various backgrounds: painting, sculpture, drawing, spectroscopy, chromatography, anatomy, astrophysics, the list goes on.

At the end of the evening we met artist Tim Pond and members of the Royal Veterinary College. It was like finding the special treat mum has put in your lunchbox – you think you have seen everything but there is one surprise left! We discussed bones and muscles; we learnt about the different orientations of quadruped’s feet, how a cheetah runs so fast and how a frog jumps so far. Did you know the fish flamingos eat gives them their pink pigment? Their anatomical knowledge is second to none. Tim’s drawings captured the pose of each animal, filling it with so much life and movement that you could just imagine it walking off the page.

This event showcased science and art at its best. Fascinating, entertaining, but most of all, engaging.

For more science and art, check out our Vaccinia Virus project  here .

.


By Pangostudios 27 Aug, 2016
What we have been working on lately is neither an Italian Tricolore Salad, nor is it a slightly odd Kinder Surprise. It is in fact the arch nemesis of smallpox! Yes, you read correctly. Pictured above  is a large scale model illustrating the cell structure of the Vaccinia Virus which was the active ingredient in the vaccine used to eradicate smallpox.

We, at PangoStudios, have been working with scientists in the labs at UCL to create 3D printed models showcasing these microscopic cells. The idea behind this project was to intrigue Joe and Jemima Public and remind them that science is fascinating! So, along with Jack Heintze from UCL, we have minimised the jargon and added a physical model enabling the public to engage with science on a more interactive level. Because, let’s be honest, being able to touch and disassemble a cell is much more interesting than reading about it!

The 3D printed Vaccinia Virus will be showcased at an exhibition later this year so stay tuned for updates!
By Pangostudios 14 Jul, 2016

It’s been an exciting month for us at PangoStudios. We have had the pleasure of working with artist Henry Reichold on a ground breaking project that brings 2D imagery into another dimension using 3D printing, which will be on display at Heathrow Airport in July.  

How were we involved?

Henry approached us with his 3D photography idea explaining it was to be 5 individual pieces of art made up of a total of 12 different pieces. They would need to be joined, cast, polished and assembled like one big jigsaw, and we love a good jigsaw!

Having worked with 3D printing for a few years we were very excited to be a part of this revolutionary display, what he had captured with his camera and transformed into a 3D print was incredible! Over the period of a month, we proceed to carry out the work and eventually, after much polishing (and quite a lot of mess), the bronze piece was complete!

Once the prints were ready we got stuck into removing the support material and cleaning up the prints, after came assembling them and creating the mould. Once this was set we went about adding on the extra details and polishing it up to give it that proper bronze shine!  

There are so many intricate details on this piece; you have to spend time observing. Through the process of making we spent so much time with each piece that new details would appear at every stage. Things like the tiny lettering in Covent Garden, the number plates on the route master busses, the faces of the tiny figures, the clothes hanging up in Camden Town, the list could go on. The detail in this 3D photograph is second to none.

The installation will be on display at Heathrow Airport Terminal 5 from the 19th of July for 3 months. If you find yourself in the area anytime soon make sure you swing by and see it for yourself! You can also read more on the project here.  

Share your pictures of the artwork by uploading them to Twitter, Instagram or Facebook tagging @Pangostudios.

Share by: